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Automobile defects can lead to accidents in South Carolina

Recalls are reported in the news quite frequently for a number of products, including automobiles. This year alone, millions of vehicles have been recalled for a variety of safety issues. Automobile defects are a serious matter that, if not addressed, can lead to the injury and/or death of unsuspecting drivers, passengers and others here in South Carolina and across the country.

Auto defects are, sadly, the cause of a fair amount of car accidents nationwide every year, including some here in South Carolina. When a defect is suspected, auto-makers have a responsibility to the public to address the problem as quickly as possible. Some examples of possible safety-related defects include:

  • Broken steering components
  • Broken or stuck accelerator controls
  • Air bag issues
  • Electrical malfunctions

Any of these or other safety-related defects pose a risk to the safety of the car owner, their passengers and others with whom they share the road. To help prevent these issues, federal guidelines are in place that set certain standards for auto-makers. Should these standards not be met, a recall is likely to be issued. Those who suspect a defect with their automobile can report the problem to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as well as the manufacturer.

South Carolina residents who have been involved in a car accident and who believe automobile defects contributed to the crash may have a number of legal options at their disposal. Legal claims can be filed against auto manufacturers and/or others in the consumer supply chain to help recoup any financial losses sustained in the incident. Claims that are successfully managed can result in monetary compensation for any damages deemed recoverable under the law.

Source: safercar.gov, “Motor Vehicle Defects and Safety Recalls: What Every Vehicle Owner Should Know“, Nov. 4, 2014

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